Editorial

On Monday, the U.S. Census Bureau delivered the United States population numbers for reapportionment and, to Alabama’s collective relief, Alabama did not lose one of its seven seats in the United States House of Representatives. This is no small part due to the herculean efforts from our federal, state and local leaders to make sure every Alabamian was counted.

This task was made more difficult by the coronavirus pandemic, which hit the U.S. about the same time as the official count was set to kick off.

The Cullman County Complete Count Committee had big plans to hold events in each city and town and at special events to encourage people to fill out the form. They were able to hold one event before all in-person events came to a halt.

Not to be deterred, the committee found alternative ways to promote the census. They shifted gears from in-person events to online giveaways, holding drawings for gift certificates from local shops and restaurants for people who completed the census. As things opened up again, the committee hosted drive-thru events and attended community gatherings to promote completing the census form.

Time and again, residents were reminded of the importance of being counted. What happened to New York this census serves as the perfect example of that. New York was one of seven states to lose congressional representation. In the press conference Monday, the Census Bureau noted the state fell short of retaining that seat by 89 people. Minnesota barely avoided losing one of its 8 seats by less than 30 people.

Kudos to the people of Cullman and Alabama for participating in the 2020 Census and to the Cullman Complete Count Committee that made sure residents participated.

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