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Thirty-five years ago, as the editor of a suburban Boston newspaper, I faced a hostile crowd in a church meeting room over a story my newspaper had written about the public suicide of a young man. Efforts to persuade him to give up his gun blocked main street traffic for several hours and ca…

Wayne Flynt is an historian of Alabama who has written nine books about the state, the most recent being Southern Religion and Christian Diversity in the Twentieth Century and Mockingbird Songs: My Friendship with Harper Lee. This column is being published by permission of AL.com, which firs…

In a market with many buyers and sellers, price plays a key role when deciding how much to purchase and how much to sell. When we go to the supermarket, we expect to pay money for the food we purchase. Sellers use this money to cover their costs and deciding how much to try to sell. Meanwhil…

The Cullman County Farm–City Committee wants to invite you on a fun and educational tour they have planned for October 23. The main goal of Farm-City is to deepen understanding of the relationship between rural farmers and urban workers. The 2017 Farm-City theme is “Agriculture: Food for Lif…

I’ve always been a firm believer in the separation of church and state. Last week, my belief was reinforced when I heard Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Diane Feinstein, D-Calif., questioning Amy Coney Barrett, a federal court nominee, during her nomination hearing.

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WASHINGTON -- Predictably and sensibly, a three-judge panel of the nation's second-most important court, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, recently dismissed, unanimously, a lawsuit brought by a Yemeni man, two of whose relatives were collateral fatalities in a 2012 U.S. drone attack that killed three terrorists. The suit asked the court to declare the attacks illegal under several U.S. statutes.

WASHINGTON -- The Bronx, the only one of New York City's five boroughs that is on the American mainland, once had a sociological as well as geographical distinction. In the 1930s it was called, as Daniel Patrick Moynihan noted, "the city without a slum." It was "the one place in the whole of the nation where commercial housing was built during the Great Depression." In the third quarter of the 20th century, however, there came, particularly in the South Bronx, social regression that Moynihan described as "an Armageddonic collapse that I do not believe has its equal in the history of urbanization."

Repeal of Davis-Bacon Act would reduce the cost of new infrastructure by many billions of dollars. And today, when social hygienists are cleansing the public square of names and statues tainted by historical connections with racism, Davis-Bacon's durability is proof that a measure's racist pedigree will be forgiven if the measure serves a progressive agenda.

"Where does new culture come from? It is copied, with alterations, from existing culture. The process is reproductive. Sexy, even. So of course, the outrage-as-a-lifestyle wing of the progressive left wants to dictate rules for its proper enjoyment."

Although the National Endowment for the Arts' 2016 cost of $148 million was less than one-hundredth of 1 percent of the federal budget, attempting to abolish the NEA is a fight worth having, never mind the certain futility of the fight. 

Much attention has been given to the non-college-educated voters who rallied to Trump. Insufficient attention is given to the role of the college miseducated. They, too, are complicit in our current condition because they emerged from their expensive "college experiences" neither disposed nor able to conduct civil, informed arguments. They are thus disarmed when confronted by political people who consider evidence, data and reasoning to be mere conveniences and optional.

Reactionary liberalism has long held, and today’s faux conservatism agrees, that existing jobs should be protected by policies that reduce the economic dynamism that threatens those jobs. Such protection means a net decrease in jobs but an increase in the self-esteem of blinkered protectionists who see the jobs “saved” but not those which, as a result of lost dynamism, are lost or never created.

Walk into your typical U.S. or U.K. grocery store and feast your eyes on an amazing bounty of fresh and processed foods. In most industrialized countries, it’s hard to imagine that food production is one of the greatest challenges we will face in the coming decades.

One of the most unsurprising things about President Donald Trump’s first days in office is that it was full of surprises in the voices and images that consumed the national media’s attention.

Too many people believe fake news on the internet. What’s worse, they share it with gullible souls on Facebook, Google and other social media, badly blurring the picture of what’s true and what’s not. 

On Thanksgiving I spent a lot of time thinking about the fact that there are bountiful blessings and many sore and broken hearts in our community. Those of us fortunate to have happy, warm, loving homes should be thankful each and every day for the Lord’s blessings on us. Those of the commun…

Somehow it’s hard to believe the Cullman County Sports Hall of Fame is only six years old. The induction of members to the hall is now an event many people look forward to each spring, with the banquet held at the Cullman Civic Center. A variety of people have been inducted into the hall s…