CullmanTimes.com - Cullman, Alabama

Opinion

April 24, 2013

COMMENTARY: Slate: Let Nurse Practitioners Do Primary Care on Their Own

As of early April, you can walk into Walgreens in 18 states (plus D.C.), and along with a gallon of skim milk, a pair of photo mugs, a six-pack of toilet paper, and a flu shot, you can meet your new primary care provider, get your cholesterol checked, pick up your statin, and schedule a return visit. That primary care provider will not be a physician but a nurse practitioner (or a physician assistant). Those states, and now Walgreens, have recognized that nurse practitioners can handle a lot more than antibiotics for urinary tract infections: They can practice primary care just fine without physician oversight. And it's a smart move.

Lagging behind are the other 32 states, in which nurse practitioners are supervised to varying degrees by physicians, the scope of their practice restricted by laws that vary from state to state. In some states, nurse practitioners can't enroll a patient in hospice, order a wheelchair, or prescribe certain medicines without a doctor's signature. This is true even when it's impractical geographically and financially, not to mention belittling. Nurse practitioners in a number of states, including Connecticut, Nevada, and West Virginia, are currently pushing for legislation for the right to practice independently and improve access to care.

The time is ripe: Despite new medical schools designed to attract students interested in primary care, the long dwindle of interest in the field has left a gaping hole, and it's growing. When an additional 32 million or so Americans are covered through the Affordable Care Act next year, the primary care physician shortage could be catastrophic; it's estimated to climb as high as 45,000 too few primary care physicians by 2020. Anyone who's looked for a new physician recently has probably heard some variant of this: "The doctor isn't taking new patients, but you can see the nurse practitioner or the physician assistant."

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