CullmanTimes.com - Cullman, Alabama

February 10, 2014

The Times' Morning Update for Monday, Feb. 10, 2014

Early weather, traffic and community news

Staff Reports
The Cullman Times

CULLMAN — Good morning, readers, this is what's happening in your county today:



Traffic:



The Cullman City Street Department will have a patch crew working on Lessman Circle SW. County Road 715 will be closed at the railroad crossing for work for the most part of the day.



Weather:



Today: A 30 percent chance of rain or drizzle, mainly before noon. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 44. North wind around 10 mph.



Tonight: Snow likely, mainly after midnight. Cloudy, with a low around 28. North wind 5 to 10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70 percent. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.



Best bets for today:



Software update at sheriff’s office: The Cullman County Sheriff’s Office has announced pistol permits and copies of reports will not be issued today between 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., due to a software update. Officials said they hope to open back up to the public around 1 p.m. today.



NARFE to meet: The Cullman NARFE Chapter 744 will meet at 11 a.m. at Ryan’s Restaurant, 1720 Cherokee Ave. SW, Cullman 35055. For all federal retirees and their spouses.



OA: Overeaters Anonymous will meet at 9:30 a.m. in the Carriage House at Grace Episcopal Church. Info: 724-376-2124 or 256-352-1143.



Therapeutic swim night: Family members and individuals with disabilities/delays can enjoy a free swim (6 to 8 p.m.) at the Aquatic and Wellness Center, 1636 Field of Miracles Dr. SW, Cullman 35055. Individuals with disabilities must be present for family members to swim. Stop at desk and say you are with Therapeutic Program. Info: Hollie Guiterrez at 256-339-2853 or Rhonda Davis at 256-962-2208.



Looking ahead:



$10,000 draw down: The Fairview Alumni Association and the Fairview Band Boosters will sponsor a $10,000 draw down Saturday, March 15, in the Fairview School lunchroom. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m. and the draw down will begin at 7 p.m. Tickets are $100 and includes dinner for two. Tickets/info: Barbara Carter at 256-734-3189 or Felicia Carden at 256-796-2931/feliciacarden@yahoo.com.



HES’s arts/crafts show: Hanceville Elementary School’s PTO will hold their Little Paws Arts and Crafts show from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. March 14-15, at the Hanceville Recreational Center, 902 Commercial St. SE, Hanceville 35077. Free admission. Refreshments sold; all proceeds to pay for classroom supplies at the school. Info: Tonya Mitchell at 256-507-3858 or email to elementarypto.hanceville@yahoo.com.



Chocolate tasting fundraiser: The Beta Delta Chapter of Alpha Delta Kappa Honorary Teachers Sorority will host the “Chocolate Tasting Extravaganza” from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13, at St. Paul’s Lutheran School auditorium, 510 3rd Ave. SE, Cullman 35055. A variety of chocolates, including sugar free! Tickets are $5 in advance or at the door. Takeouts available. Proceeds go to the Sorority’s scholarship fund for a student pursuing a career in the teaching profession. 



Did you know?



There’s a new diet out there that’s becoming really popular: The Chocolate Diet. If this works, then it will be the diet of all diets! Read this from AP Pittsburgh.

Newly published, a book says anyone can "Eat Chocolate, Lose Weight."

Dr. Will Clower, a neuroscientist, says eating chocolate can help you eat less all day. Studies conducted with thousands of people proved it.

"What we see in all these people is that the amount that they're hungry for at the plate will drop by a half to a third," he said. "And the amount that they're hungry for, the amount of between meal snacks that they have, will drop by about a half."

However, there are specific rules that you have to follow to make it work.

The first rule is the darker the chocolate, the better.

"So all of the good stuff in chocolate comes from one place and one place only - and that is the cocoa," Dr. Clower said.

Cocoa that is 70 percent or higher is ideal.

At Mon Aimee Chocolat in the Strip District, you can find chocolate as high as 100 percent. However, If you don't like dark chocolate, the book explains how to train your taste buds and curb your sweet tooth.

Rule No. 2 is to make sure you eat the chocolate 20 minutes before and five minutes after lunch and dinner.

"With the little piece of wonderful, rich dark chocolate at the end of your meal, it stabilizes the sugar onset into your blood stream so that you have more of that blood sugar more often throughout the afternoon, so you're just not hungry," Dr. Clower explains.

The third rule to follow is to make sure each portion is no larger than the end joint of your thumb.

Rule number four is to savor the chocolate, not chew it, which might take some getting used to.

Last, consistency is key. Rule No. 5 requires you to do this every day.

This is how the diet worked for some of the people who followed these rules while eating healthy, all-natural foods at meal-time.

There are also other benefits in addition to weight loss if you eat dark chocolate. It gives you more energy, protects against sunburn, improves dental health, helps diabetics by stabilizing blood sugar, helps prevent cancer and improves your mood.

"If they brain scan people and have them eat chocolate while they're doing it, their pleasure centers are like a Christmas tree - everybody's happy in there," Dr. Clower said.



10 Things to Know for Today

By The Associated Press

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. AP FINDS MILITARY’S HANDLING OF SEX-ABUSE CASES VERGES ON CHAOTIC

Analysis of more than 1,000 cases in Japan shows suspects unlikely to serve time even when authorities agreed a crime was committed.

2. WHO PRODUCED THE MOST SCRUTINIZED TV MOMENT OVER THE WEEKEND

AP’s Dave Bauder says Ashley Wagner’s one-word response to her score triggered viewers to rewind their DVRs.

3. AVERAGE BRITONS FEAR RIGID CLASS SYSTEM IS BACK ON THE RISE

But the story is more complicated this time. Elite still rule, but lineage is less important, and money and education count for more.

4. PILOTS DON’T SEEM TO KNOW THE WAY TO SAN JOSE

AP finds at least 150 planes since the early ‘90s have landed at the wrong airport or caught their mistake in time. Silicon Valley airport cited the most.

5. WHY ARGENTINA’S CURRENCY TROUBLES AREN’T HURTING BRAZIL

Unlike a decade ago, larger middle class and buildup of foreign reserves have insulated the country from its neighbor to the south.

6. NEW YORK CITY CLOSE TO BANNING HORSE-DRAWN CARRIAGES

That leaves the worrisome question of what will happen to the 200 horses licensed to work in Central Park.

7. WHEN CANCELLATIONS BECAUSE OF SNOW ADD UP TO HEADACHES

Schools in at least 10 states have had so many this winter they’ll have to schedule makeup days or sacrifice some of their spring holidays.

8. WHAT NEW YORK’S NEW MAYOR WILL SAY IN HIS STATE OF THE CITY SPEECH

Bill de Blasio is expected to offer a glimpse into his signature goal of fighting the city’s widening income inequality gap. 

9. U.S. ECONOMY MAY BE AS ROBUST AS IT’S GOING TO GET

Short-term drag from weather, slow growth overseas may be followed by demographic hit as baby boomers retire.

10. NORTH KOREA RESCINDS INVITATION TO DISCUSS RELEASE OF AMERICAN DETAINEE

The State Department is “deeply disappointed” in Pyongyang’s decision to withdraw a second offer for a U.S. envoy to discuss jailed businessman Kenneth Bae.