CullmanTimes.com - Cullman, Alabama

Health

July 3, 2013

Five quick safety tips for using 4th of July fireworks

Stay safe on the 4th of July and avoid being one of the hundreds sent to them emergency room with an injury from a firework.

Staying safe

Leading up to the 4th of July, hundreds of people will visit the emergency room with injuries from fireworks. Hands and fingers account for the most injuries, 46 percent, with sparklers being the single most injury-prone firework according to U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

While injures from fireworks are common, a few simple safety tips can prevent trips to the emergency room on this 4th of July.

Know your fireworks

Make sure you read the warning labels and performance descriptions before igniting. As fireworks can be redesigned from year to year, what performed one way last year might perform differently this year.

Have a designated shooter

For family shows, have one person designated to light and fire your night fireworks. Also, make sure spectators are a safe distance away from the show.

Have parental supervision

Parents and caretakers should always closely supervise teens if they are using fireworks and should not allow young children to handle or use fireworks, including sparklers.

Don't relight the "duds"

Never try to relight a “dud” firework. Wait 20 minutes before touching the firework and then soak it in a bucket of water.

Soak fireworks

After the fun has passed, soak spent fireworks with water before throwing them away outside.

Think you know all there is to know about fireworks? Take the NCFS quiz on firework safety. Safety tips courtesy of The National Council on Fireworks Safety.

Text Only
Health
  • Doctors to rate cost effectiveness of expensive cancer drugs

    The world's largest organization of cancer doctors plans to rate the cost effectiveness of expensive oncology drugs, and will urge physicians to use the ratings to discuss the costs with their patients.

    April 16, 2014

  • treadmill-very-fast.jpg Tax deduction for a gym membership?

    April marks another tax season when millions of Americans will deduct expenses related to home ownership, children and education from their annual tax bill. These deductions exist because of their perceived value to society; they encourage behaviors that keep the wheels of the economy turning. So why shouldn't the tax code be revised to reward preventive health?

    April 15, 2014 1 Photo

  • Boston doctors can now prescribe you a bike

    The City of Boston this week is rolling out a new program that's whimsically known as "Prescribe-a-Bike." Part medicine, part welfare, the initiative allows doctors at Boston Medical Center to write "prescriptions" for low-income patients to get yearlong memberships to Hubway, the city's bike-share system, for only $5.

    April 12, 2014

  • Fast, cheap test can help save lives of many babies

    As Easley did more research into her daughter's death, she learned that a pilot program had started just months earlier at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, Md. (Easley had delivered at a different hospital in the Washington area.) The program's goal was to screen every newborn with a simple pulse oximeter test that can help detect heart problems such as Veronica's, allowing doctors to respond.

    April 8, 2014

  • CEMS groundbreaking CEMS holds groundbreaking

    March 31, 2014 1 Photo

  • Which foods are the worst for the environment?

    As with most arguments about our food supply, though, it's not that simple. Although beef is always climatically costly, pork or chicken can be a better choice than broccoli, calorie for calorie.

    March 15, 2014

  • ERIC-HOLDER.jpg Holder: Heroin deaths an 'urgent and growing public health crisis'

    Attorney General Eric Holder, calling the rise in deaths from overdoses of heroin and prescription painkillers an "urgent and growing public health crisis," is outlining a series of efforts by the Justice Department to combat the epidemic.

    March 11, 2014 1 Photo

  • Study says too much protein could lead to early death

    Even as researchers warned of the health risks of high-protein diets in middle age, they said eating more protein actually could be a smart move for people over 65.

    March 4, 2014

  • Six reasons childhood obesity has fallen so much

    A major new paper appearing in Wednesday's edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that childhood obesity - age 2 to 5 - has fallen from 13.9 percent in 2003-04 to 8.4 percent in 2011-12.

    February 27, 2014

  • Does your insurance plan cover self-inflicted injuries?

    Dealing with a suicide or attempted suicide is stressful enough. Some health plans make the experience worse by refusing to cover medical costs for injuries that are related to suicide or an attempt - even though experts say that in many cases such exclusions aren't permitted under federal law.

    February 26, 2014